Man and Woman in Snow
University of Wisconsin

Staff

The staff consists of a multidisciplinary team of professionals, including physicians (geriatrician, endocrinologist, and rheumatologist), nurses, social worker, physical therapist and nutritionist, who specialize in treating people with osteoporosis.

Neil Binkley, M.D.

Dr. Binkley earned his MD degree from the University of Wisconsin Medical School and subsequently received his training in Internal Medicine at the Marshfield Clinic. After several years in private practice, he returned to the University of Wisconsin in 1990 and completed a geriatric fellowship. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. In 1994 he was instrumental in establishing the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Center and the Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program, offering treatment options unavailable in standard clinical practice. Additionally, his research efforts focus on osteoporosis diagnosis, osteoporosis in men and the role of nutrition in skeletal status and the link between muscle bone and fracture risk. Recent studies of vitamin D and sarcopenia (the age-related decline in muscle mass) are lending valuable data to the osteoporosis field. Dr. Binkley is an internationally recognized expert in osteoporosis, sarcopenia and vitamin D. He is past president of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry, on the Scientific Advisory Board of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and Editorial Board for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Bjoern Buehring, M.D.

Dr. Buehring earned his medical degree from Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany and subsequently received his training in Internal Medicine at the University of Wisconsin. He completed a Rheumatology fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic and Geriatric fellowship at the University of Wisconsin. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, and Geriatrics. He has been affiliated with the Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program since 2006 and joined the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Center faculty in 2012. He has clinical affiliations with the University of Wisconsin Osteoporosis and Rheumatology clinics and with the William S. Middleton VAMC. His research efforts focus on muscle mass evaluation, physical function in older adults, sarcopenia diagnosis and how these factors contribute to fracture risk, and loss of mobility and independence. Recent studies of functional assessment and sarcopenia diagnosis have been recognized receiving young investigator awards and invitations for oral presentation. Dr. Buehring is a member of the University of Wisconsin Institute of Aging, the Scientific Advisory Board of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and is participating in the American Geriatrics Society Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disease Special Interest Group.

Diane Krueger, BS, CBDT, CCRC

Ms. Krueger earned a BS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and subsequently has been involved with the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program since its inception in 1994 serving as program manager. Since that time, she has conducted more than 50 clinical trials focusing on osteoporosis diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Specific research interests include bone mass assessment and body composition measurement. Ms. Krueger is faculty and Update Committee Chair for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD)/International Osteoporosis Foundation osteoporosis and bone densitometry course for technologists. She is currently ISCD Vice President.

Gretta Borchardt, BS

Ms. Borchardt earned a BS from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse and subsequently conducted research in genetics, HIV and assay development. She joined the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program in 2012 serving as laboratory manager. Since that time, she has refined the HPLC methodology to measure 25-hydroxy vitamin D and is evaluating the utility of cytokines and proteins to predict bone and muscle status and change. Ms. Borchardt has published manuscripts on genetics, infection and immunodeficiency.

Ellen Siglinsky, BS, CBDT, CCRC

Ms. Siglinsky earned her degree at the University of Wisconsin and joined the UW Osteoporosis Research Program in 2010 as study coordinator and also oversees study recruitment and coordinates scientific presentations. Since that time, she has conducted clinical trials focusing on vitamin D, cardiovascular disease, muscle function and osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Specific research interests include vitamin D supplementation, muscle function assessment in older adults and vascular reactivity. Ms. Siglinsky was recognized with a Young Investigator Award by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry in 2012.